ONLINE SEMINAR
January 8 | Picasso and Matisse: The Battle for Art

$250.00

This seminar is sold out. To join the wait list, please email us.

In 1906 Henri Matisse finished his masterpiece “Le Bonheur de Vivre.” The following year, in response, Pablo Picasso painted “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.” So began a friendship and a rivalry undertaken in paint and exhibited on canvases. In this seminar we will explore the historical context of these two works, consider them in light of the extensive careers of their creators, and trace their legacies. Would it be Picasso or Matisse who would be most remembered? Most revered? We will investigate the battle between these two giants of the art world and consider the ways their rivalry framed the development of modern art.

When: Four weekly sessions on Saturdays at 2:00 p.m. Eastern, starting January 8, 2022

Duration: 2 hours per session

Cost: C$250 plus 13% HST (approx. US$195 plus 13% HST)

Group Size: 12-participant limit

How: We meet on Zoom; you will receive joining instructions approx. 3 weeks before the seminar start date. For your privacy, all our Zoom seminars are password-protected and are never recorded. See full conditions at the bottom of this page.

All seminar payments are nonrefundable. All discount codes must be used at time of purchase. If you would like to apply your Toronto Pursuits 2020 deposit to this seminar, please contact us.

Out of stock

Description

LEADER

Dr. Wendy O’Brien is a philosopher with over 30 years’ experience teaching in academic and nonacademic environments, including Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Wilfrid Laurier University, the University of Waterloo, Harvard, Oxford and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Her work explores subjects including power, violence, the relation to the Other, home, silence, and creativity. She is presently working on a long-term project on the concept of wonder. An active member of the Ontario literary scene, she has been an interviewer for organizations including By the Lake Book Club, the Toronto International Festival of Authors and GritLit, as well as hosting Bourbon and Books book club in both Toronto and Hamilton.

MATERIALS

Images and links to relevant resources will be provided to participants upon registration. Weekly questions will be provided to guide viewing of the artworks and to navigate online resources.

 

In 1906 Henri Matisse finished his masterpiece “Le Bonheur de Vivre.” The following year, in response, Pablo Picasso painted “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.” So began a friendship and a rivalry undertaken in paint and exhibited on canvases. Although these paintings became touchstones of modernism, their influence stretched beyond any one movement. Their existence prompted a renewed focus on questions such as, What is the purpose of art? What inspired the creative process? How was the audience to approach the work of art? And who was the greatest artist of their time? These were the questions the two painters took up and took on through these masterpieces and their respective careers.

In this seminar we will explore the historical context of these two works, consider them in light of the extensive careers of their creators, and trace their legacies. Would it be Picasso or Matisse who would be most remembered? Most revered? We will investigate the battle between these two giants of the art world and consider the ways their rivalry framed the development of modern art.

All online seminar payments are nonrefundable. All discount codes must be used at the time of purchase; no retroactive discounts will be issued.

“You have got to be able to picture side by side everything Matisse and I were doing at that time. No one has ever looked at Matisse’s painting more carefully than I; and no one has looked at mine more carefully than he.”
— Pablo Picasso

All seminars are subject to minimum enrollment of 7 participants. Click the link for full terms and conditions for Classical Pursuits online seminars.

Classical Pursuits does not record seminars. By participating in any seminar, registrants agree not to make their own seminar recordings and to abide by the Classical Pursuits code of conduct.

Image credit: Le bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse, 1906, in the collection of the Barnes Foundation