ONLINE SEMINAR
June 8 | Women of Greek Drama – Tuesday evenings

$350.00

Antigone, Medea, Electra, Phaedra, Clytemnesta—some of the most memorable female characters in drama first came to life on the stage in ancient Athens, at a time and place where women had little presence in public life. All the more remarkable, then, that the playwrights who created them gave a voice to such noble, intelligent, passionate—and above all, strong—women who were keenly aware of the constraints placed on them by the society in which they lived.

When: Six weekly sessions on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 p.m. Eastern, starting June 8, 2021

Duration: 2 1/4 hours per session, with a short break mid-session

Cost: C$350 plus 13% HST (approx. US$273 plus 13% HST)

Group Size: 12-participant limit

How: We will be using Zoom; you will receive instructions on how to join upon registration. For your privacy, all our Zoom seminars are password-protected and are never recorded.

All seminar payments are nonrefundable. If you are interested in applying your Toronto Pursuits 2020 deposit to this seminar, please contact us.

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Description

LEADER

Mark Cwik is the education manager for Classical Pursuits. He is a longtime Toronto Pursuits and trip leader and has been an organizer of adult great books discussion groups for 25 years. He specializes in literature from the ancient, mythic and religious world. Mark lives in London, England.

BOOKS

The Greek Plays: Sixteen Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, edited by Mary Lefkowitz and James Romm
(Modern Library, 2017)
ISBN-13: 978-0812983098

Please be sure to obtain this edition.

We encourage you to support local bookstores or other independent sellers, especially as alternatives to Amazon.

In the US and the UK, try Bookshop.org, World of Books, or Ebooks (electronic books only)

In the US and Canada, try Powell’s Books, IndieBound, and Thiftbooks (used books only in Canada)

In Canada, try McNally Robinson or Indigo

Antigone, Medea, Clytemnestra, Phaedra, Electra—some of the most memorable female characters in drama might first have appeared on stage before an audience of only men (with the roles played by men, as well). We are not sure whether women were even allowed to attend theatre performances in 5th-century Athens. We do know, at least, that these fascinating characters were created in a place and time where women had little place in public life.

It’s remarkable, then, that the playwrights who brought them to life gave a voice to such noble, clever, passionate—and above all, strong—women who were keenly aware of the constraints placed on them by the society in which they lived. Whether in doing so the writers were portraying what they admired, what they desired, or what they feared, is much less clear.

In the six weeks of this seminar we will read six of the finest Classical-age Greek dramas, from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides—the latter, especially, showed a keen interest in the lives of women: Aeschylus’ Agamemnon; Sophocles’ Antigone and Electra; and three plays by Euripides, the Medea, Hippolytus and Bacchae.

“Him twice I smote – twice groaning prone he fell,
With limbs relaxed; then, prostrate where he lay,
Him with third blow I dowered, votive gift
To Hades, guardian of the dead below.”
—Clytemnestra, in Aeschylus’ Agamemnon

All online seminar payments are nonrefundable.

Main image: “Clytemnestra”, painting by John Collier, 1882.

 

Additional information

Choose registration type

Standard registration, Toronto Pursuits 2020 credit

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